Approach Direction in Bowling

Drift is a common problem among players. However, for long-time players, they can take advantage of this effect even in a very narrow number of parameters. The most important is that the amount of drift is small, one or two tables and does not change from one part of the lane to another.

If the bowler is on the right track, he cannot stay behind the ball at the point of release without throwing the ball directly into the trough. In an attempt not only to do that, he had no choice but to come to the ball early and sacrifice the power at the point of release.

Directions are always important, but with modern lanes and modern bowling balls, it’s even more important. First we have to talk about skating because the change in skating in modern bowling affects the direction of all the other steps. Historically, archers were taught that the sliding foot must end in a position where the toes are pointed in the opposite direction to the bowling hand.

of all the other steps. Historically, archers were taught that the sliding foot must end in a position where the toes are pointed in the opposite direction to the bowling hand.

This ensures two square shoulders become foul lines to allow the ball line to parallel the lane. Today, the ball is usually projected from left to right. To facilitate this, almost every top-level archer ends up with his skating feet pointing in the direction he wants the ball to go; out to the stop, from left to right.

The direction of the other steps serves two functions: allowing the ball to rotate freely without having to go around the body of the pitcher. And put the pitcher in a position where the skid can go from left to right so he can project the ball to the stop. Let’s use the five-step approach to discuss the directions of each step, but for the four-step approach, just ignore the comments on the first step.

The two diagonal steps are important to clear the side hips of the ball in both backswing and downswing. If those two steps do not intersect, the hand may have trouble standing behind the ball on the way down. This can cause chicken wings or rise to the top, robbing the release of power and roll. Another problem is that when the first step in the five-step approach to the right begins to drift to the right.

Finally, when the foot slides open to the left, it can cause a kind of penguin movement, because that motion with the foot tends to want to move the ball around the archer’s body to bring it straight. line. As the foot slipped along the projection, the body felt that it was aligned.